How Your Smart Phone Steals Your Smarts

With just a few taps of your finger (or thumb!), you can access more information than most people throughout history could ever conceive of. Without ever having to leave your couch, you can browse the libraries of thousands of universities, communicate with experts on a million subjects, and check out the latest scientific research. But is your smart phone actually stealing your smarts? More and more people say that this is the case, and when it comes to your relationships and performance, that tiny computer in your pocket may be doing more damage than ever before. Read on to find out how your cell phone steals your brainpower, relationships with others, and more!

Concentration and Memory

Many people in today’s world report difficulty getting through a chapter of a book, or even a whole magazine article. Why? Because we are constantly dividing our concentration. The thought of spending 15 or 20 minutes on just one task is almost unheard of—after all, you could check social media, reply to a quick text, glance at the weather, see if the nannycam for the kids is showing any activity… after all, if your phone can keep all these apps open in the background, can’t your brain? The truth is, you can’t. Even the best multitaskers are pretty bad at multitasking, because the human brain only has a single “processor” built in. You may think you can do it all (at once), but if you notice that it is hard to stay focused, remember the details, or keep a good timeline, it may be because your brain is in the habit of only giving partial attention.

Relationships and Connection

Your smart phone isn’t just sapping your brainpower, it’s affecting your relationships. When you check your phone in the middle of conversation or engagement with others, you are saying “this phone/person/thing is more important to me than our conversation right now.” It sounds ugly, but it is true. Sometimes, it’s okay—if you check your phone a few times to make sure the kids are okay while out with a friend, this is a good thing—your children’s safety is more important than rehashing the latest gossip with your friend. But when it becomes a habit, think of the damage it can do. Your device may be breaking the bond  between you and your significant other. Where a high-powered CEO may look more important when he or she takes a call or replies to an email during a meeting, you would be right to start looking for a new therapist in Littleton if this happened during session! If you are checking messages, you are not listening actively , and you may find that friends and family even stop talking with you.

Finding Balance

Even the most technology-avoidant therapist in Highlands Ranch isn’t going to tell you to ditch your smart phone. But can you find a balance that works for you and the others who are important for your life? One way is to turn off those push notifications! They aren’t there to help you—they are almost always there to sell you something or remind you to “do” something—usually, buying something. They take away your power of choice and leave you as a passive consumer. Shut them off, or set limits on when you can be interrupted. When you are busy with a task or with family, consider the ultimate: shut the whole phone off! Even if only for an hour or two, notice the change you feel without the constant demands on your energy and attention.
For some people, technology goes behind normal use and escalates into addiction. If you are having problems putting your smart phone away or if you feel like your use is affecting your relationships or functioning, seek effective, evidence-based counseling in Highlands Ranch today!

 

 

Get Ready for Back To School Season with these Top Tips!

It seems like summer just got started, but for many kids and teens in Colorado, the back to school season is here! Going back to the “daily grind” after taking a few months off can be a challenge for everyone—after all, the days of sleeping in late, lounging in the pool, and planning epic multi-day sleepovers are likely gone for another season. However, getting your children ready for the best year possible at school is no small task. Many parents seek the expert help of a Littleton child behavior psychologist for tips on managing friendships, getting homework done, and handing behaviors. Read on to find out some great tips for every age!

The First Timers: Starting Kindergarten

If your child is starting school for the first time, get ready for an exciting time! Hopefully, you have already prepared your young child for the fun he or she is going to have at school! Most schools have programs to let new students meet their teachers or tour the school early, and these can be great anxiety reducers. Always be positive while talking about school with your little one, even if you are as nervous as they are! And make sure to drop off with a big smile—you’ll be there at the end of the day to see how they did! For children who are fearful to start school, working with a play therapist  in Littleton can help to introduce scary topics in a friendly, supportive way.

The Importance of Routine

For kindergarteners, middle school kids, and even graduate students, having a routine is key to success in school. There is so much to do, so much to remember, and so many opportunities for stress to break through! Often, when you work with a psychologist in Littleton, you will discuss household and family routines that can be modified or added to increase success. Routines help by making certain things like morning hygiene, after school homework, or cleanup time “automatic” and predictable.

Plan For Success

For parents of students who have been in school before, you may notice the same problems creeping in each year. Does your son always end up with a stack of missing assignments by conferences time? Is your daughter usually in a “major fight” with all her besties before the fall break? Make a plan for how this year will be different and see how it helps! This might involve getting your kid involved in creating an organization system  that works for them, scheduling regular play dates or hang out times with a true friend, or establishing clear parent-teacher communications. Don’t wait until the problems grow into disasters, tackle them early.

Don’t Forget the Fun!

Finally, remember that starting a new school year can be stressful for you and your child! In between the scheduling, planning, and studying, make room for rest and relaxation! Think of starting a new school year like starting a new job and it will be easy to understand why your child or teen just needs some time to “chill.” If you notice that your child never seems to have fun, has fears or worries that keep her from attending school, or if you just need some extra help, contact a teenage psychologist or children’s play therapist in Littleton to see results today!